The 7 Main Stages of Dementia

Medical specialists as well as caregivers divide dementia into stages to enable them measure the severity or progress of the condition. In each stage, a person’s cognitive function declines to a certain extent. Most people are aware of severe, moderate or mild Alzheimer’s but you can categorize dementia into 7 stages.

Stage 1: normal mental functionThis is the lowest dementia stage characterized by no cognitive impairment. At this stage, dementia doesn’t show any symptoms like memory loss, behavioral or social changes.

This is the lowest dementia stage characterized by no cognitive impairment. At this stage, dementia doesn’t show any symptoms like memory loss, behavioral or social changes.Stage 2: Very minor cognitive decline

Stage 2: Very minor cognitive declineAt this point, there’s very mild impairment that may quickly go unnoticed by the caregiver. It’s still the onset stages of dementia and the individual doesn’t have very noticeable cognitive decline.

At this point, there’s very mild impairment that may quickly go unnoticed by the caregiver. It’s still the onset stages of dementia and the individual doesn’t have very noticeable cognitive decline.Stage 3: Mild cognitive impairment

Stage 3: Mild cognitive impairmentThis stage is characterized by more regular cognitive issues that caregivers can notice. It is very important to recognize the signs of dementia at this stage because you can seek treatment and make the condition manageable. Common signs of dementia at this stage include verbal repetition, lack of concentration and organization, trouble driving, working, memory loss and forgetfulness.

This stage is characterized by more regular cognitive issues that caregivers can notice. It is very important to recognize the signs of dementia at this stage because you can seek treatment and make the condition manageable. Common signs of dementia at this stage include verbal repetition, lack of concentration and organization, trouble driving, working, memory loss and forgetfulness.Stage 4: Moderate cognitive decline

Stage 4: Moderate cognitive declineThe early symptoms of dementia that were mentioned above will become more prominent at this stage. This stage is mostly referred to as early signs of Alzheimer’s. Caregivers should stay alert for signs such as social withdrawal, lack of responsiveness, denial of symptoms and emotional moodiness.

The early symptoms of dementia that were mentioned above will become more prominent at this stage. This stage is mostly referred to as early signs of Alzheimer’s. Caregivers should stay alert for signs such as social withdrawal, lack of responsiveness, denial of symptoms and emotional moodiness.Stage 5: Moderately severe cognitive decline

Stage 5: Moderately severe cognitive declineAt stage five of dementia, the individual is no longer able to do day to day activities such as dressing and bathing without some assistance. This is also marked as the onset of mid-stage dementia The symptoms that will manifest at this stage include confusion, reduced problem solving ability, forgetting personal details and events.

At stage five of dementia, the individual is no longer able to do day to day activities such as dressing and bathing without some assistance. This is also marked as the onset of mid-stage dementia The symptoms that will manifest at this stage include confusion, reduced problem solving ability, forgetting personal details and events.Stage 6: Middle dementia.

Stage 6: Middle dementia.At this stage, the individual is considered to have a moderately severe Alzheimer’s disease The person would need a caregiver to help in activities of daily living such as dressing, bathing and eating. Some people experience sleep difficulty, incontinence and anxiety. Others are even unable to recognize their loved ones.

At this stage, the individual is considered to have a moderately severe Alzheimer’s disease The person would need a caregiver to help in activities of daily living such as dressing, bathing and eating. Some people experience sleep difficulty, incontinence and anxiety. Others are even unable to recognize their loved ones.Stage 7: Severe Alzheimer’s disease.

Stage 7: Severe Alzheimer’s disease.At this stage, the person has very severe cognitive decline. He/she is typically unable to take care of themselves, communicate and may even have mobility issues. At very severe cognitive decline the person may be unable to walk, speak or do anything without help.

At this stage, the person has very severe cognitive decline. He/she is typically unable to take care of themselves, communicate and may even have mobility issues. At very severe cognitive decline the person may be unable to walk, speak or do anything without help.Identifying the stages of dementia will help you or a loved one to plan for the care you need when you need it.

Identifying the stages of dementia will help you or a loved one to plan for the care you need when you need it.